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suffered a heart attack. 40 years ago today, right for abortion was established with the roe v. wade case. shannon bream has more on where we are now. >> the issue of the roe v. wade opinion 40 years ago does little to settle the debate over abortion. pro-life advocates have tange their fight to the state level where the legislators across the country enacted numerous laws aimed to rolling back roe, sparking battles over required ultra sounds and regulation for abortion clinics. because of the number of the pro-life state measures passed in 2012, pro-choice groups for reproductive rights, crr said last year was assault on women reproductive rights. one thing the two sides agree on the fight is not over. >> there is rising tide across the country of pro-life legislators for bigging up the flag and advancing the defensive life and law. >> relentless attack on the street services. i expect that to continue on the state level. >> happy anniversary, baby. >> crr is taking heat over an ad meant to mark 4th anniversary of the rode six entitled "happy anniversary, baby." they say the use of the w
court's landmark ruling on abortion in the case of roe versus wade. this morning, new poll numbers show what a majority of the country thinks about this always controversial topic. good morning from washington. it's tuesday, january 22nd, 2013, and this is "the daily rundown." i'm chris cillizza in for the "he lost his voice" chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. five years ago, candidate barack obama laid out his vision of the presidency, talking about leadership in an interview with the "reno gazette-journal's" editorial board. >> i think ronald reagan changed the trajectory of america, in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not. and in a way that bill clinton did not. he put us on a fundamentally different path, because the country was ready for it. >> that wasn't the way president obama talked during his first term, but that was the guy who launched his second term yesterday. in an 18-minute address, the president laid out a defense of liberalism, a forceful argument for progressive values. just as president reagan made the conservative movement mainstre
important. coming up, 40 years after roe v. wade shows -- we will look at setbacks in the fight for choice when the president of planned parenthood joins us just ahead. mom always got good nutrition to taste great. she was a picky eater. well now i'm her dietitian and last year, she wasn't eating so well. so i recommended boost complete nutritional drink to help her get the nutrition she was missing. and now she drinks it every day. well, it tastes great! [ male announcer ] boost has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones, and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. and our great taste is guaranteed or your money back. learn more at boost.com [ dietitian ] now, nothing keeps mom from doing what she loves... being my mom. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com
>> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama's forceful new focus on progressive ideals echoed across the nation on this day after the inauguration. and it earned him bo
to afghanistan. and wade zirkle-- he served two tours in iraq as an infantry officer in the marine corps, and earned a purple heart. i guess i'll ask both of you starting with you colonel haring, what is good and what is bad about this change? >> well, i think pretty everything is good about the change. it opens a vast number of opportunities to women across the military. but i think this is a win for not only women but also our military and really the country broadly. >> ifill: i'd ask wade zirkle the same question. >> sure, gwen. i think this is generally good. i think your viewers need to understand that this is is merely the lifting of a ban and the service chiefs need to decide how it's going to be implemented. so there still will be some occupational specialties that will be restricted from women. so i think generally it's good. it's good for women, it's good for the military, it's good for our country. although there are a lot of questions as to how they'll be implemented. >> ifill: let's walk through these starting with you kohl they will haring. today at the pentagon when secret
wade. from the state where the landmark decision began. >> looking at live pictures, the u.s. capitol, it's snowing in washington, d.c. you can see the snow flakes. a lovely sight. thousands of antiabortion activists gathered for the annual march for life rally. it's time to go inside with the 40th an verse of the rowe versus wade decision in the united states. meantime a new nbc "wall street journal" poll shows for the first time a majority of americans, 54% believe abortion should be legal in all or most cases and 44% said it should be illegal. 70% of americans are opposed to the controversial rowe versus wade decision being overturned. 70% do not want it overturned. our senior medical correspondent travelled to texas where the case began to get a rare firsthand look at the fight over abortion today. >> wolf, this week marks the la wade case. i went back to texas to look at the state of abortion there. roe versus wade began in texas, and 40 years later, the situation here and much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand, the gov march made this vow. >> my goal, and the goal of many
want to conclude today, since this week marks the 40th anniversary of the landmark case of roe v. wade, those of us who have been involved as a lawyer trying cases, civil cases such as roe v. wade was a civil case, those of us that have been involved as a judge as i was also a chief justice, we know that in order for a case to be right, that it can be heard in court, there must be a judiciable issue, such as in roe v. wade, but the person bringing the case has standing to bring the case, took years but we ultimately find out that at the time there was no standing. we find out from the person who was roe, fictitious name, she deeply regrets what had happened and that case has been responsible for the killing of millions of lives. and i have so many dear friends on the democratic side of the aisle, i know their hearts. they don't want people to get killed. they care about life. and so many on both sides of the aisle talk about trying to protect, quote, the most vulnerable among us, unquote. i would humbly submit there is no one more vulnerable than an unborn child. there is that chord th
the land mark roe v. wade decision was handed down. >> can a nation long endure that does not respect the sanctity of life? >> rand paul's question is backed by stunning numbers. they find four in step unintended pregnancies in the u.s. end in abortion. one-third of american people have an abortion by the age of 45. the procedure is decreasing overall, among poor women are up 18%. >> certainly, i'm disappointed in the election. no doubt about that. this is the most pro-death president we have had. >> adding to election year woes, controversial remarks by the pro-life candidate todd akin and murdoch helped doom g.o.p. hope of reclaiming the senate. the sinking poll numbers late last year parallelled the flip-flop in the gallup poll. showing 44% of americans are pro-choice. 40% pro-life. the losses were tempered by gapes at the state level. >> states we got 33 pro-life governors and pro-life legislatures. >> pro-life leaders are buoyed by the roll that science is playing if affirming their view, life begips at conception. medical science acknowledges the child as the newest patient. no
having an abortion. it is the ever increasing vitriol of roe versus wade. >> no connendation in christ. >> they hope to heal her emotional wounds. >> i think ultimately i would like to convince women to make a different choice. if a woman is going to make it. make it fully inform know there will be a consequence and a price that is paid and it is huge. >> i realized there were so many women living with a secret and they felt alone and no one else was going through it >> according to the institute on sexual and reproductative think tank nearly half of all pregnancy are unintended and four out of 10 of those end in abortion . they hope telling their stories to the world it will bring a different understanding to a different issue. >> it is not something you wear as a badge and like saying i used to smoke when i was a teenager. jane delainey never had children, a conscious decision. >> it was self reservation. i felt i didn't deserve happiness or deserve to have more children and all of that changed when i went through the first bible study. >> producers hope to reproduce the study in ano
anniversary of the supreme court's roe vs. wade decision which legalized abortion. in the decades since that decision was handed down, the issue's gotten even more contested. anti-abortion activists taking their fight now to the states. in the last year alone, 19 states enacted 43 provisions to restrict abortion. arizona put the most restrictions into effect, seven, and elizabeth cohen went back to texas where roe vs. wade, well, the decision began. we'll learn more about the decision fight today. >> reporter: roe vs. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand, the governor has made this vow -- >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality -- hi, it's elizabeth at cnn. >> great. come on in, ma'am. i'm at the whole woman's health clinic austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> any more ultrasounds? >> i don't think we have any more. >> rorter: amy started whole women's health ten ye
"roe versus wade." the supreme court decision that legalized abortion was handed down 40 years ago this week. this year's rally and march came in frigid temperatures. protesters carried signs and chanted slogans on the steps of the supreme court. abortion rights demonstrators staged a counter-demonstration there. republican senator saxby chambliss of georgia will not run for a third term in 2014. in a statement today, chambliss said, "this is about frustration." he said he's unhappy with president obama's direction and tired of partisan gridlock. chambliss had angered tea party forces when he supported tax increases as part of a plan to tame the federal deficit. wall street closed the week with another rally. the dow jones industrial average gained 70 points to close near 13,896. the nasdaq rose 19 points to close at 3,149. the s&p 500 finished above 1,500 for the first time since 2007. for the week, the dow gained nearly 2%; the nasdaq rose half a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: we turn to israel, where prime minister benjamin netan
wade decision. charlie joins us from new york, on the republican line. caller: good morning. one morning, the first sergeant announced there were eliminations from the pt test. women could not do it. if you cannot pass your pt test, you cannot be promoted. do not give me the lie that standards are not going to be lowered. they will be. the problem is, we no longer have generals like george patton, matthew ridgway, curtis lemay, and douglas macarthur. that is the problem. host:, for the call, charlie. this is a headline based on the report looking at the issue of sexual harassment in the military and the focus of airforce leaders focusing on culture -- yesterday, general dempsey was asked about that culture of seco -- sexual harassment in the military. this is a portion of what he had to say. >> i believe it is because we have had separate classes of military personnel, at some level. it is far more complicated than that. when you had one part of the population that is designated as warriors, and another part that is designated as something else, i think that disparity begins to e
rally, activists gathering to overturn the roe versus wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide on this day in 1973. and right now, they are marching toward the supreme court. last year an estimated 400,000 pro-life activists hit the street. this year's event is expect today top that and they are, you see outside on a very cold day to make their point for america. well, in texas, a 3 billion dollar power plant project is now dead. 4,000 potential jobs are now lost, says the company. and the people behind the project say the epa is to blame. the whole thing involved what was supposed to be a state of the art coal fired plant to be built in corpus christi, texas. lauren simonetti is reporting on the fox business network, what went wrong for the company here? >> hi, megyn. good afternoon. this is a story, the power plant came, and they looked to get the appropriate air and water permits to need to build the power plant and they wanted to use something petroleum coke or pet-coke part of the petroleum process, a remnant and use that in the plant and usually it's sent internationally
v. wade the -- meanwhile we have the debate over other science as well. what if they do to bring that up? >> clearly the administration likes to use the regulatory agency as a bludgeon and play to the constituency. if they wanted to make sure that i would vote for this debt ceiling increase. they could atacht rains act to it. which my predecessor got passed through the house. but stick that and send to the senate and say it's a reasonable proposal. it's going help the economy. >> we need wrap up. we can take a couple of more questions. >> following on that. -- from the house and senate this spring. will you seek out the funding of planned parenthood. >> that will will be in the appropriations process. there have been two bills introdisused by the house and there's an effort to -- mike the governor of indiana and so there will be an't cod effort. you would think out of 3.7 trillion budget we could find somewhere to cut and certainly that's one good place to start. >> if any finalized budget will you support it or vote against it. with the budget there's two things going on. one is
important supreme court decisions. but in 1973, ladies and gentlemen, 1973 roe v. wade, we sell l bait that as well. and we're not going back. [cheers and applause] all right. i got all of that cleared up. [laughter] is interim chair, lord knows you get your moments. but i don't want any of this detracting from my 15 minutes, because when my time come, i want all my minutes. this is not part of my minutes, this is debbie's, but i'm helping. as any good woman would do for another sister. [laughter] so at this time, the chair would suspect the motion to suspend the rules and let congresswoman debbie wasserman-schultz as chair of committee by acclamation. >> so moved! >> hallelujah, so moved. all those in favor signify by saying aye. >> aye! >> all those opposed? good. that sounded pretty unanimous to me. ladies and gentlemen, fellow democrats, it gives me great pleasure. please help me congratulate our reelected chair of the democratic national committee, congresswoman debbie wasserman-schultz! [cheers and applause] it is my pleasure again to turn the meeting back to our fearless leader,
and the gay-rights movement, could make this a mistake that we made four years ago with roe v wade, that we did not allow the democratic process, the legislative process, the social process of debate and acceptance and so on to run its course. we trust that with a ruling by the supreme court and we have been in the streets for over four years and probably will be for another 40 because we did not allow the legislative process to continue. if you did speak to those, thank you very much. guest: on the recess appointments -- host: what was the decision the caller was referring to? guest: the president's appointments during a recess period or unconstitutional. he waited for congress to be out for a couple of days and pushed through four confrontation -- controversial appointments to the new labor relations board and of -- and it includes the cordray appointment. the recess appointment clause was created for a different purpose. when i testified in congress, i said i believe that all these recess appointments or unconstitutional. the court of appeals actually agrees with that position. it unanim
that the estimates are 50 to 55 million unborn americans have been aborted since roe v. wade was decided. it is true of those who are at the end of their live who is will be treated under obamacare. i think it can lead to a disrespect for life more broadly. i think we need to do everything to infiltrate the respect for life which, frankly has been growing to the surprise of many. public opinion is moving toward the pro life direction in recent years. i think hopefully it will continue to move in that direction. i don't think it is a alba tross around our necks. if you look in swing districts where republicans lost. they did not lose because they were pro life. they lost because, you know, votes on taxes or spending or regulations or so forth. it is very rare to find republican politician who is have lost because they are pro life, i think. >> let's glance in on gay marriage. people say like us, you have to give up your view of marriage if you want to win another election. do you think they have a point? >> i don't think they do. i'm a supporter of traditional marriage. that is not disrespect for gay
term in 2014. in washington, it is the 40th anniversary this week of the roe v wade decision that legalized abortion. a live look on the national mall. the 40th march for life is on the way. among the speakers, former republican republi and it rick santorum -- candidate rick santorum, . >> being pro-life for the last three years is considered the new normal. >> while we wait for president obama, a look at this morning's "washington journal." host: should female service members perform the same dangerous and physically demanding tasks day in and day out for weeks and time? -- wilson, little rock, arkansas. caller: that is one of the most ridiculous things. even though women are just as brave, it is no doubt about it every year he their physical ability and their stamina i am an ex-paratrooper from the military. training for women has gotten easier. women can be distracting for men as well. host: the orders to end combat exclusion, seeing that it will level the playing field in careers. brian on the republican line from wisconsin. welcome to the program. caller: glad i got a ho
anniversary of the roe v. wade decision which legalized abortion. [background sounds] [background sounds] >> many streets are closed for the rally and march, which will take marchers to the steps of the supreme court this afternoon. we are covering this event in its entirety life on a website. go to c-span.org. >> tonight at eight we wish we highlight some president obama's second inauguration festivities beginning with the pre-ceremony events. >> you can see all that tonight at 8 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> personal-finance starts as we now in the 1930s with sylvia porter. it's really a spinoff out of the self-help business of the 1930s to the 1930s are known for everything from the hard economic times of the 1930s you see everything from alcoholics anonymous developed in the 1930s to napoleon they can get rich to various personal activist movements. fascism and communism. and there's this fulcrum going on at the. some -- over a period of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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